Community Based Programs

PASOs Health Connections

PASOs Community Health Workers (CHWs) work closely with all members within Latino households (men, women, and children) in a variety of settings such as clinics and community-based locations to connect them with health and community services. CHWs also help individuals to address social or environmental factors which could include connection to primary care, reproductive health needs, nutritional and social supports (Medicaid, SNAP, WIC etc).

In addition to individual resource navigation, PASOs works to improve access to culturally appropriate resources by partnering with local agencies and coalitions. PASOs’ CHWs engage in outreach and leadership training to increase local capacity to address the community’s needs and build on their strengths.

Why is it important?
  • CHWs can improve the quality of care given to the Latino patients/clients of a health system, clinic or community organization.
  • Clinical care only constitutes 20-25% of a person’s overall health. The remainder is related to social and environmental factors. This program aims to alleviate these other pressures.
PASOs Health Connections is offered in:
  • Midlands
  • Greenville Area
  • Low Country
  • Tri County Area
  • Spartanburg
  • Georgetown

In 2018

Individuals were connected to resources to help them thrive

Community members reached through 190 community outreach events

Community members educated on reproductive health topics with 469 being assisted with connecting to a method of their choice

Children and 347 adults enrolled in WIC for improved maternal and infant nutrition

PASOs Connections for Child Development

In 2018

Children participated in CCD program

Parents learned new skills to support child development at home

%

of parents and children successfully connected to needed resources or successfully used learned skills

PASOs Community Health Workers (CHWs) screen children’s development primarily at the family’s home and other sites including clinics and libraries. Children that exhibit developmental needs are referred to appropriate resources, therapies, and specialty care.

CHWs also further connect families to resources that address child development, hunger, medical needs, and other social determinants of health.

Why is it important?
  • South Carolina has seen a 900% increase in the Latino child population under the age of 15 in the last 20 years.
  • Latino children currently represent 10% of SC’s child population ages 0-5, and in some counties the totals reach over 25%.
  • Detecting a developmental need early greatly increases the chance of effective early intervention.
This program is offered in:
  • Low Country
  • Midlands
  • Tri County Area
  • Spartanburg